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Quand le 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion U.S. libérait le Loiret

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Quand le 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion U.S. libérait le Loiret

Message par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:30

Command Post,
Binas, France.
Coord 320421, 1/100,000
15 2400 August, 1944.


The battalion, less Company "B" which is attached to Task Force "S", departed from Lemans, France, beginning at 151420 August, and established bivouac only in an open wheat field on the outskirts of the village of Binas, France, at 152400, traveling total distance of 71 miles in the rain and darkness. No enemy contact was made during the advance. Enemy planes flying above the column dropped numerous flares and one time attempted to strafe the column but due to the interval of the vehicles and darkness it was noneffective.

Major Schuster, acting battalion commander, led the convoy to Binas, and at 2400 hours he decided to establish an overnight bivouac and allow the men to get a little rest. The same ovation was extended to us enrooted as was on the trip to Lemans, France. The civilian population utterly lined the road, in the rain, some under umbrellas and some without, throwing flowers, fruits, and vegetables to the men, and when they could passing them cognac and wine into the vehicles; some by the drink, and some by the bottles.

As we crept down the road in the blackest of darkness, without lights of course, a stream of tracer fire could be observed occasionally to our right; then to our left and sometimes to the front. An occasional burst of AA fire would illuminate the sky and bomb flashes could be observed in the distant east; so far the sound was not audible. This particular part of France is on the plain order; greatly resembling Texas and visibility under normal conditions is excellent for miles.

At 2400 hours we pulled off the road into the edge of a large wheat field and bedded down for the night. The rain had ceased and everyone got a little rest prior to daylight. Enemy aircraft zoomed over the column several times and dropped a few flares trying to pick up the position of the convoy which they knew was in the general vicinity, but they done to bombing or strafing during the night, due to the extreme darkness and poor visibility.

Company "B" as part of Task Force "S" departed from Lemans, France, at 1100 hours with the remainder of the Task Force, and closed in Coulmiers, France, at 152400 August, 1944, without enemy contact.

There is no enemy activity reported in our zone of advance as far east as 9 kilometers east of Saint Calais, France, but a total of 8 prisoners, stragglers which had been left behind by their units were rounded up by elements of the division during the period.

Two enemy ammunition dumps were captured intact at coordinates 4251 and 5559, 1/50, 000, when the enemy was forced to hastily abandon them. Disorganized small groups of enemy foot troops are reported running to and fro, scared, lost and confused, to the east and north of our zone of advance. The enemy evidentially planted these groups to harass our advance by a delaying action and limited counterattacks, but after they were left, they suddenly realized their situation and have been completely overcome with fear and confusion.

Company "B" after closing in assembly area placed the 1st and 2nd platoons in indirect fire positions in support of the 127th Field Artillery Battalion and the 3rd platoon took up positions in Orleans, where it engaged in a small skirmish with a group of isolated enemy troops, killing and wounding an undetermined number without suffering casualties. The 1st and 2nd platoons were relieved from support of the 127th Field Artillery Battalion and entered Orleans on primary mission at 151900 hours. The companies were under battalion control during the move but remained in direct support of their respective infantry regiments; company "A" 137th and company "C" 320th Infantries.

The Reconnaissance Company established their overnight bivouac at Chantome, France, at 2345 hours. Private Charles W. Sanders was transferred to Headquarters Company during the period.

As the battalion departed from Lemans, France, the gas and oil section under Corporal Max H. Tauber, and consisting of Pvtlcl Joseph H. Canavan, Privates Wilbur I. Beard, Stanley J. Budzenski, Boyd P. Greason, Theodore L. Gressel, Marcus D. Jones, Philip Klein, Private lcl Robert E. Abbott, with motorcycle guides and messengers Tech 4 Grade Casper G. Scheel, Junior, and Lee J. LaBorde, Junior, and Tech 5 Grade Vander D. Suggs, was left in the battalion assembly area at Lemans, France, to guide the section to the battalion upon its arrival from the gasoline DP. The section arrived at the old assembly area about 1800 and started to catch up with the convoy but due to the extreme darkness and inclement weather was forced to bivouac by the roadside for the night.

The weather was fair until 1530 when it became overcast with light cold rain for the remainder of the period.

320th Infantry departed from Lemans, France, at 152130 August, with mission of capturing the town of Chateaudun, France. The 134th Infantry advanced to Binas, France, and there established guards and sent patrols across the Loire River in the vicinity of Freteval, France. Task Force "S" moving down Lemans-Orleans Highway behind CCA of the 4th Armored Division, reaching railroad at coordinates 627407, 1/50, 000, where they encountered fierce enemy resistance.




Dernière édition par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:40, édité 1 fois

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Re: Quand le 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion U.S. libérait le Loiret

Message par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:32

Command Post,
Thiville, France.
Coord 259548, 1/100,000.
162400 August, 1944.


At daylight all the female population, some beautiful too, turned out to greet the tired and sleepy Yanks. Gangs and gangs of them run down the column pulling the blankets from over the Joe's faces who were sleeping in the ditches by the roadside and smothering them with kisses, shouting "viva la Amerique". Major Schuster, the acting battalion commanding officer decided that if his unit was to be committed during the day as a unit he'd better get them away from the girls, which was good sound judgment (even if he himself did hate to go), so we mounted our vehicles and among the screaming and shouting of the entire town we continued in our chase of the retreating demoralized enemy. Company "A" in support of the 134th Infantry, remained in the vicinity of Binas, France, with one platoon in antitank positions and the remainder of the company performing motor maintenance and resting.

The Command Post Group departed from Benias, France, at 0730 hours and established in the town of Ouzouer-Le-Marche, France, at 0930 hours, a distance of 9 miles. The command post remained in this little French town until 1830 hours. During the period the men were allowed to visit the town, the first American soldiers to enter it since the last world war. The entire population turned out and threw their places of business and the doors of their homes wide open to the men of the battalion. The mayor of the town made a public address to welcome us to his village.

Wine beer and cognac was served to the men by places of business and individual families. At 1300 hours the town turned out in a dress parade to celebrate their freedom. Religious services were held at the Tomb of World War I dead; the first time such formation had been held since 1940 when the Germans overrun the country. The Star Spangled Banner and the French National Anthem, The Marseilles were played in the town square by the town's official band. Town officials addressed the population and American soldiers. Later the officials paraded down through the town and around the square. The town was wild and out of control. Everywhere one could see two or three French girls pulling at the arms of the soldiers, and some even arguing with one another as to found him first. The town was immediately decorated with American and French flags which were brought from their hiding places and it gave the impression of an old timey American fair and carnival. Occasionally the spokesman for the mayor of the town would call attention in French from his rostrum in the square and they would sing and then shout: "viva la Amerique" - "la Bosche kaput". The Germans thought they did a good job on looting the town of all items which they could use, especially the liquors and wines, but the French knowing their traits had outsmarted them by burying it in nearby fields and they were digging it up and bringing it into the town in columns. Immediately upon our entry into the town the French underground elements (FFI), came forward in full dress French uniforms which they had concealed awaiting this hour for years. Church bells rang throughout the day from churches in the town and surrounding villages proclaiming liberty once more.

German collaborates were immediately rounded up and shot by the FFI without trial or even a mock trial. They were executed before the entire population of the town. French women and girls who had been friendly with German soldiers were rounded up, brought before the town officials, belittled, undressed, their heads shaved and hands tied behind them and paraded through the main section of the town surrounded by husky FFI guards who would occasionally lash one with a long whip, cutting a gash inches long in their legs or backs. Some, the habitual type, were branded on each breast with the nazi symbol with red-hot branding irons.

About 1500 hours a group of German prisoners were being escorted through the town by three American military police. Someone shouted "Bosche, Bosche, Bosche", and it appeared that the entire town made a surge for them simultaneously; beating them in the face, spitting upon them, pulling their hair and cursing them in German. The men of the battalion were forced to rescue them from the mad Frenchmen. Those prisoners were happy Germans when we intervened to keep the Frenchmen from killing them, which they were going to do on the spot. The French even after we had take over, threw rocks at them as long as they were in sight. The military police got them out of the town in a hurry and directed others enroute to the prisoner of war cage to take another route around the city.

Money was of no value as far as the American soldier was concerned in the town; he could not spend it as the population would not stand for it whatsoever. The population, as well as the men of the forward echelon of the 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion command post will forever, yes forever, remember the welcome the people of Ouzouer-Le-Marche, accorded them. It made one feel, that after all, some people appreciated what they were doing by fighting this war.

At 1800 hours the command post group departed from the little town and proceeded to the vicinity of Thiville, France, where the command post was established under light and intermittent enemy artillery fire at 1930 hours.

The gas and oil section having spent the night on the roadside during the night was directed to proceed to Orleans, France, to refuel company "B" who were in support of the 137th Infantry and Task Force "S", attacking the city of Orleans, France.

When the two trucks and the section, plus three motorcycle guides approached the outskirts of Ormes, France, a member of the FFI and down the road toward them and told them that CCA of the 4th Armored Division had just attacked the town, killing a number of Germans but that the town was full of the enemy in dug in positions and that they were going to resist and fire on anything that looked like an allied vehicle or soldier.

Corporal Tauber and his crew, plus the motorcycle guides immediately dismounted and forming a skirmish line, attacked the town from all sides. The section killed and wounded an undetermined number of the enemy who were firing upon them from foxholes in and round the village, and after about one hour seventy five enemy soldiers surrendered to the section. After the prisoners were placed under guard they set out to search any foxholes which might still contain German soldiers and found one Polish prostitute hiding in a dugout where she had been living with a German soldier. The woman was turned over to the local FFI, who immediately stripped her clothing from her body, shaved her head and eye brows and when the gas and oil section departed were horse-whipping her with whips. For this heroic and meritorious act on the part of the section each member was awarded the Silver Star Medal.

The prisoners were turned over to CCA of the 4th Armored Division for internment. At 1400 hours the local FFI reported enemy troops in the town of Meung, France, and two platoons of the reconnaissance company were dispatched to obtain further information. Company "A" departed from vicinity of Binas, France, and established CP 1 mile northwest of Ferte Villeneull, France, at 1955 hours, a distance of 11 miles.

The command post of Company "B" departed from vicinity of Lemans, France, and established command post 1 mile northwest of Bucy, France, coordinates W5344, 1/250, 000, at 1800 hours; traveling a total distance of 80 miles without enemy opposition.

All platoon occupying primary positions in the city of Orleans in direct support of 137th Infantry. 1st platoon supporting the 1st battalion; 2ns platoon 2nd battalion and 3rd platoon, which entered the city of Orleans at 1300 hours, the 3rd battalion, 137th Infantry.

The 3rd platoon, Company "B" destroyed 2 enemy tanks, one 75mm self-propelled gun, one truck, observation tower and an undetermined number of enemy soldiers at a concentration point on the south bank of the Loire, River. One M-10 was slightly damaged when it was hit by enemy artillery fire but remained operational. There were no personnel casualties.

Company "C" departed from Binas, France, and established in the vicinity of Chateau-de-Champs Romain, France, at 1910 hours, a total distance of 13 miles. No enemy contact was made during the period. Company remained in direct support of 320th Infantry.

The reconnaissance company departed from vicinity of Benias, France, where they were bivouacked in the wheat field with the remainder of the battalion, less company ?B? and proceeded to Chateaudun, France, at 2000 hours, a distance of 25 miles. Enroute to Chateaudun made contact with enemy and participated in fire fight after which the enemy withdrew and company proceeded to Chateaudun, France.

The 3rd reconnaissance platoon commanded by 1st Lieut. John W. Spain and staff sergeant Raymond R. Wilson, and attached to Company "B" with positions in Orleans, France, established and maintained an observation post in the steeple of the tallest church in Orleans during the first part of the period. The enemy realizing that our forces were using the steeple as an observation post fired upon it continuously attempting to knock it out, but sergeant Wilson and Pvtlcl Joseph A. Ebert and Pvtlcl Italo P. Gatto, eventho they were under a continual artillery and mortar barrage and also small arms fire, refused to leave the position, from where they were directing the fire of the 3rd platoon of Company "B" on enemy positions, tanks, troop concentrations, etc. They were not relieved until 1900 hours, at which time the platoon was given the mission of patrolling the road leaving Orleans to the southwest throughout the night.

When a strong force of enemy troops were reported in the village of Meung-sur-Loire, France, the 1st and 2nd reconnaissance platoons under 1st Lieut. Alexander H. Smith, Jr., and Staff Sergeant Ruel R. Windham, respectively, were immediately dispatched to the vicinity of the town to investigate the report. They arrived in the village at 1700 hours, being the first U.S. Troops to enter the town since 1918. The platoons were on the outskirts of the village by the local FFI as guides and as they entered the city the population first thought them to be Germans and all went inside their homes.

The village 'crier', which is a custom of the French who still maintain the old ancient custom of announcing special news events by a village or town crier who walks or rides up and down the street crying out the new, when he realized that American solders had entered the village started running up and down the streets calling to the top of his voice 'les Amerique'. The people of the town at first refused to believe the report. But, when they finally realized that U.S. troops had entered the village they went absolutely wild. Within ten minutes the village was decorated from end to end with French and American flags. In short order the vehicles of the platoons ere covered with flowers and each jammed full of girls hugging kissing the men. The platoons were utterly mobbed. They could not move! The girls kept scrambling up the sides of the dusty, grease-soaked vehicles and kissed the dirty, dusty and unshaven faces of the men. This was another duplication of the demonstration at Ouzour-Le-Marche. The platoons remained surrounded for three hours with girls, women, men and boys, and when the FFI did re-establish order it was determined that the Germans had passed through the village during the night and morning; some walking, some riding mules, some limping, some riding oxen, goats, wheel-barrows and pulling donkey carts, muttering "too many Americans"; "too many airplanes"; "too much artillery". Some were crying as they staggered to the east under the onslaught of the 35th Infantry Division and Third U.S. Army.

The platoons departed from village at 1900 hours and rejoined the command post in the vicinity of Chateaudeun where they made a thorough reconnaissance around the town and of all roods running east, south and northeast, going as far east as Yevres, France. Task Force "S" advancing down the Lemans-Orleans Highway entered Orleans city hall at 161900 August against stiff resistance, and the city was completely occupied by 170600 August, 1944.

The 320th Infantry advancing on Chateaudun, detrucked in the vicinity of Vogay, France, and attacked town of Chateaudun against fierce enemy resistance. Patrols entered the town at 161950 August, 1944, but stiff resistance in the vicinity of Jallone, France, held up the main body of the regiment and made it necessary that a readjustment be made of the lines south and southeast of the town. The 3rd battalion captured the town of Cloyes at 161930 August, 1944, where the battalion was relieved by then 167th Engineer Battalion.

Heavy concentrations of artillery were placed on enemy positions on the outskirts of Orleans and south of the Loire, River on enemy artillery, mortar and machinegun positions. Also on strong points, observation posts and troop concentrations points. One platoon of Company "A" ordered to Cloyes, France, to protect vital crossings on the Loire River.

CCA, 4th Armored Division spearheaded the attack upon Orleans by Task Force "S"; overcoming resistance at Ormes, France, and assisted Task Force "S" in capturing Orleans. During the period the division and attached units captured the cities of Cloyes and Orleans in the most part and were attacking Chateaudun on the outskirts of the city. At the end of the period the enemy was retreating to the northeast out of Chateaudun, France, but he was determinedly defending roadblocks in the city of Orleans, France. He is also laying minefields in the streets of Orleans, all of which are covered with automatic weapons.

No artillery fire fell in the Chateaudun sector but light artillery fire fell in the northern approaches of Orleans, France. Troops from all branches of the service have been identified in the Orleans sector, but nothing but SS troops have been identified in the Chateaudun sector.

Two enemy ME109's bombed and strafed our positions in the Orleans area at 1100 hours. One enemy plane over Chateaudun at 1530 on reconnaissance. No strafing or bombing reported. A total of 40 prisoners were captured by the division and attached units during the period.

Weather during the entire period was warm and clear with excellent visibility.



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Re: Quand le 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion U.S. libérait le Loiret

Message par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:33

Command Post
Thiville, France.
Coord 259548, 1/100,000.
172400 August, 1944


The enemy continued to resist in the outskirts of Chateudun and Orleans; American artillery placed TOT's on all strong points in the edge of the cities and inflicted heavy casualties upon the enemy as he attempted to withdraw at the beginning of the artillery barrage. Chateaudun and Orleans both were completely occupied by the division during the period against fierce enemy resistance.

Immediately after the enemy was completely routed from Orleans he began to shell the city from positions south of the town along the banks of the Loire River. Prisoners are still being rounded up from rear echelon establishments.

In the Chateaudun sector the enemy withdrew to the north and northeast about 0600 hours, and he harassed our advance in Orleans with defended road blocks, mines and artillery.

One ME 109 flew over the division sector at 2120 hours evidentially on reconnaissance mission as no bombing or strafing was reported. Scattered groups of infantry continued to surrender after putting up light resistance as they are dug-out of their hiding places. It is estimated that the enemy has two battalions of infantry in the bend of the river just south of Orleans. Reports form FFI in the vicinity of Patay indicate that there is about 100 enemy soldiers in the town with anti-tank guns. A total of 44 prisoners were captured by the division and attached units during the period. The FFI reports that they had been in Vallainville, France, and had fired upon enemy soldiers in that town, and that the enemy had withdrew to the vicinity of Domerain, France.

Task Force "S" advancing down the main road towards Orleans behind CCA, 4th Armored Division. 2nd Battalion, 137th Infantry opened attack and advanced to City Hall at 161900.

City completely occupied at 171900 August, 1944. Chateaudun captured by the 320th Infantry at 171200 August, 1944. Cloyes captured by 320th Infantry at 161700 August, 1944. The command post, Headquarters Company and Medical Detachment, less some elements, remained within the vicinity of Thiville and Chateau de Champs Romain, France, during the period. FFI reports scattered isolated groups of enemy troops overrun in the woods in and around the command post. One group consisting of 800 enemy soldiers bypassed by our advancing elements are resisting in the vicinity and a FFI officer, a former colonel in the Field Artillery of the French Army has obtained permission form General Baade to go in and attack them with his 1,000 FFI members.

The weather during the period was warm and fair; excellent for operations.

Some enemy air activity over the area during the night but no bombing or strafing reported. Company "A" took up anti-tank positions in the vicinity of Headquarters XX Corps, at coordinates 152532, 1/50, 000. Company command post remained in the vicinity of Binas, France, on the road to Chateaudun, France.

The command post of company "B" was established 5 miles southeast of Chateaudun, France, coordinates 257548, 1/100, 000 at 2230 hours without enemy contact. All platoons in anti-tank positions in the city of Orleans, France. When the 3rd platoon destroyed the two enemy tanks, one 75mm SP gun, the observation town; they also destroyed one enemy general purpose truck and captured one enemy soldier.

The command post closed in its previous area and established at La Ferte Villeneuil, France, 255253, 1/50, 000; a distance of 4 ½ miles without enemy contact. 1st Lieut. George C. Little was admitted to hospital during the period due to illness.

The command post of the Reconnaissance Company remained in the vicinity of Chateau de Champs Romain, France. All reconnaissance platoons remained attached to gun companies during the period. No enemy contact by the command post group.

At 0835, Captain Allin, acting division antitank officer, took the 1st platoon of company "A" into the town of Cloyes, where they established antitank positions.

A reconnaissance patrol led by 1st Lieut. Alexander H. Smith, Junior, went into the outskirts of Yevers, France, without contacting enemy opposition. Civilians report that no enemy armor has been in that sector. 1st Reconnaissance platoon has listening posts set up on the outskirts of Chateaudun, France; established at 2030 hours.

At 2350 hours Company "C" occupied the following positions; 1st pl, 1st section at 248617; section at 241625. 2nd platoon: 1st section at 224624 and 2nd section at 225611. 3rd platoon: 1st section at 24080 and 2nd section at 242572, 1/50, 000.




Dernière édition par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:41, édité 1 fois

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Re: Quand le 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion U.S. libérait le Loiret

Message par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:33

Command Post,
Vicinity of Thiville, France.
Coordinates 259548, 1/50, 000.
182400 August, 1944.


Task Force "S" continued to occupy Orleans, France. The enemy shelled the town with heavy caliber artillery from the north and northeast at 170600 hours.

The 320th Infantry continued to occupy Chateaudun with one battalion on the high ground in vicinity of Chateney, coordinates 220645, and one on the outskirts of the town. Patrols went as far as Bonneval during the period which was accomplished by the 3rd Cavalry Squadron, without contacting the enemy.

Field artillery of the division fired harassing and interdictory fire after the hours of darkness with unknown results.

The 60th Engineer Battalion replaced blown-out bridge at St Dennis Les Power, France. The main accomplishments of the division and attached units during the period was the continued occupation and security of Orleans and Chateaudun, France.

The 320th Infantry captured 101 prisoners during the period; Task Force "S" 317, and 140 were turned over to the prisoner of war collecting point by the local FFI working with the division.

The enemy at present has no cohesive front line in the division sector. Elements of the 358th, 348th and 360th Marsch Battalions are reported south of the Loire River in the Orleans sector, Scattered, inaccurate artillery fire fell in the vicinity of the 137th Infantry command posts at 171600 hours to 1800 hours. Enemy infantry columns were reported moving south and east of Etampes, France, at 1100 hours by air observers.

Contact with small isolated enemy groups were reported by reconnaissance elements of the 3rd Cavalry, along the general line Patay-Cormainville, France. Two tiger tans were reported in the vicinity of Aigexville, coordinates 360770, by air reconnaissance at 1230 hours. There was scattered, but light artillery fire in the city of Orleans, France.

One JU-52 flying from west to east at 300 feet altitude flew over the command post, vicinity coordinates 615446, 1/50, 000 at 1350 hours. French civilians traveling from Bordeaux to Orleans report movement of supply and vehicles to the north and east along main road in general direction of Orleans, Metz-Troyes, France.

American air strike at coordinates 443674 announced at 1350 hours; strike will be made upon enemy supply points and troop concentrations.

At 1430 hours 320th Infantry moved to general line coordinates 235645 east to 270645. FFI reported to staff sergeant Windham, platoon leader, 2nd reconnaissance platoon that there were no enemy tanks in the woods of the Bois-de-Moleans.

The reconnaissance company reports that the bridges at Sheury and Moleans are intact and that they are capable of holding out destroyers. Enemy armored column sighted on road south of La Conie River at 1915 hours. All roads reported clear to Cormainville by the reconnaissance company.

At 2145 hours the 3rd reconnaissance platoon under 1st Lieut. John W. Spain and staff sergeant Raymond R. Wilson, reported that at least 150 German soldiers crossed the Loire River at Orleans; but, that the FFI are efficiently taking care of them the hard way. One of the sergeants of the platoon on outpost thought that he heard the Germans withdrawing from their positions south of Orleans.

The positions of the command post groups of the battalion, Headquarters, Reconnaissance companies and the Medical Detachment did not change during the period.

Colonel Lansing McVickar, the former battalion commander, now in command of the 9th Tank Destroyer Group, to which the battalion is presently attached, visited the command post during the day, inspecting installations and renewing his acquaintances. He was well pleased with his former organization and was full of praise in its accomplishments.

The command post of Company "A" did not change. The 3rd platoon in antitank positions guarding the XX Corps was relieved by the 1st platoon during the period. No enemy contact was made by any element of the company . 2nd Lieut. Raphael B. Jenkins was transferred to company "C" during the day.

The command post of Company "B" remained 5 miles southeast of Chateaudun, France, during the period; coordinates 257548, 1/100, 000, Sheet 9H. No change in positions of the company during the period. The FFI have taken over Orleans and the enemy has withdrawn completely from the northern banks of the Loire River.

Company "C" closed in their former command post area and established 3 miles south of Chateaudun, France, coordinates 249571, 1/50, 000, at 0215 hours, a distance of 3 miles.

2nd Lieut. Jenkins joined the company from company "A" during the period.

No enemy contact during the period. 2nd battalion, 320th Infantry moved to a line, coordinates 255645, east to 270645. Bridges intact at Dheury and Moleans, France.

The command post remained at Chateau de Champs Romain, coordinates 291547. Private Charles W. Landers? Transferred to Headquarters Company as of the 15 August, 1944. Tech 5 Grade Wallace T. French? To Headquarters Company and Private Paul A. Peterson, from Headquarters company to Reconnaissance Company.




Dernière édition par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:41, édité 1 fois

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Re: Quand le 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion U.S. libérait le Loiret

Message par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:34

Command Post,
Vicinity Poupry, France.
Coord 613626 1/100,000
192400 August 1944.


The 134th Infantry made a thorough reconnaissance of the area Chateaudun - Orleans - Beaugency and Moree, which was completed at 181400 August, 1944. Units in the vicinity of Beaugency received quite a bit of small arms fire from south of the Loire River. One platoon guarding bridge in the vicinity of Freteval, France.

Task Force "S" dissolved at 181200 August. 137th Infantry remained in the city of Orleans but moved to the outskirts of the city.

The 320th Infantry moved to an assembly area north and east of Chateaudun, France at 191200 August, 1944, to secure town.

The enemy has no cohesive front line in division sector. Contact with small isolated groups are reported by the 3rd Cavalry during the period. 1500 Germans were reported moving north to Olivet at 181645 August, south of Orleans. Approximately 100 enemy soldiers reported in woods at coordinates 5370 and 200 at Janville, France. A road between Janville and Allainee is reported covered by enemy artillery fire. One enemy tank reported in woods at coordinates 5370, 1/100,000.

FFI report that the towns of Varize, Cormainville and Orgeres-en-Beauce, have been cleared of the enemy.

83 prisoners of war were captured during the period from antiaircraft units, security units and Marsch Battalions.

The command post, headquarters company and the medical detachment closed in the vicinity of Thiville and Chateau-de-Champ Romain at 1940 hours and established 1/4 mile northeast of Poupry, France, coordinates 612623, 1/100,000, at 2350 hours, a distance of 43 miles, without enemy contact.

The weather was fair during the first part of the period; turning to overcast with rain about 2200 hours.

The command post of company "A" departed from 1 mile northwest of Villeneull, France, and established command post 3/4 mile north of Santelly, France, coordinates at 1945 hours, a distance of 48 miles. Company remained in direct support of the 134th Infantry during the period without enemy contact. Company commander, platoon leaders and platoon sergeants made reconnaissance of area for antitank positions.

Company "B" moved from 5 miles southeast of Chateaudun at 1940 hours and established command post 1 mile north of Poupry, at 2200 hours, a distance of 25 miles. Present coordinates of command post 614626, 1/100,000. No enemy contact. All platoons remained in primary mission in and around the city of Orleans, France. Lieut. McNaught, platoon leader, 3rd platoon, crossed the Loire River south of Orleans with a French patrol and verified the fact that ???? knocked out two towed guns on 17 August, 1944 by direct fire.

The command post of Company "C" closed in old area and established 1/2 mile northwest of Le-Puiset, France, coordinates 631721, 1/250,000, at 2030 hours, a distance of 26 miles. No enemy contact during advance. Company notified of Tech 5 Grade Ben Hubbell's death as the results of wounds received in action in vicinity of Mortain, France, 12 August, 1944.

All platoons in antitank positions in the vicinity of Chateaudun in support of the 320th Infantry, but no contact was made with the enemy during the period.

The command post of the Reconnaissance Company closed 3 3/4 miles southeast of Chateaudun at 1930 hours and established 1/4 mile northeast of Poupry at 2150 hours, a distance of 43 miles without enemy contact during the advance.

At 2300 hours, the rain started to fall and all the men were sleeping in an open wheat field, without shelter or foxholes since most all arrived after the hours of darkness. All were thoroughly soaked, including their bedding the remainder of the night. Miserable! No ???? we thought at that time. We just did not know then what was ahead.

The 3rd reconnaissance platoon continued to make reconnaissance in and around Orleans. This platoon captured 2 prisoners, both in civilian clothing during the period. This platoon also patrolled the road running southwest from Orleans along the Loire River to Beaugency, France, screening the right flank of the division. Road was patrolled from 171900 August until 180930 August. The 1st reconnaissance platoon continued their reconnaissance to north of Chateaudun, France, and neighboring towns. Patrolled to the outskirts of Yevres, France, and back to Chateaudun, France without contacting any enemy. Lieut. Smith, platoon leader, 12t reconnaissance platoon turned over enemy maps and documents that he picked up in a former German Headquarters. The remainder of the reconnaissance company remained in assembly area in the vicinity of the command post on an alert status. All platoons were out ahead of the infantry on their reconnaissance in both sectors: Orleans and Chateaudun.




Dernière édition par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:41, édité 1 fois

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Re: Quand le 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion U.S. libérait le Loiret

Message par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:34

Command Post,
Vicinity Poupry, France
Coord 613626, 1/100,000
202400 August 1944.


134th Infantry remained in assembly area. 137th Infantry in assembly area in the vicinity of Orleans, France. 320th Infantry captured and secured the towns of Toury, Janville and Allaines, France, during the period. The 35th Cavalry Reconnaissance Troop maintained contact with XX Corps on the north flank of the division. CCA, 4th Armored Division, relieved from attachment to the division. Field artillery fired on all roads leading out Orleans during the period. Fired harassing fire on known enemy positions.

It is believed that the 3rd Company, 668th Engineers (German), is located in Pithiviers, France, and it is further indicated that at least one enemy infantry division is maintaining dug-in positions in the woods north of Fontainebleau, France. There is an enemy ammunition DP at Fontainebleau, France.

A few anti-tank defenses with antitank guns emplacements are scattered in the division sector.

Several anti-tank units, according to the FFI have withdrawn to the north and east during the period. A little artillery fire fell in the city of Orleans during the night.

Personnel mines made on the order of an ointment box were encountered in the city of Orleans. One of these mines was covered with a plastic material and very closely resembled a rock. Another one was covered with paper and camouflaged to represent horse manure.

A total of 3 prisoners were captured during the period.

The division G2 section estimates that there are 1 German General and 3000 troops at Montargis; 12 antitank guns, 1 88 mm guns, 7 machine guns and a road block at Pithiviers. 300 soldiers and 5 antitank guns and 3 machine guns at Beaune-Larelande. 200 soldiers, 5 antitank guns and 3 machine guns at Bellegrade. All roads leading into Pithiviers are heavily mined.

The FFI also report that there are 20 enemy tanks, 12 antitank guns and one 88mm gun in the city of Pithiviers, France.

The command post, Headquarters and Reconnaissance Companies remained in the vicinity of Poupry, France, during the period. Weather was rainy and cold during the period. Some enemy air activity over the are but no bombing or strafing reported.

Company "A" remained 3/4 miles north Santilly, France, coordinates 652682, 1/100,000 in direct support of the 134 Infantry. Command post in wheat field during the period and enemy planes were over the area during the period making reconnaissance of the area.

The 3rd platoon took up antitank positions in the vicinity of coordinates 704671, 1/ 50,000 during the period. Combat Team 134 with Company "A" attached began advance on Barville-en-Gatinais at 1200 hours.

The command post of Company "B" was established 1 mile north of Poupry, France, coordinates 614626, 1/100,000, at 1600 hours; a distance of 20 miles without enemy contact.

One platoon attached to 134th Infantry; the remainder of the company in assembly area.

There was no change in the command post of Company "C" during the period. 1st and 2d sections of the 3rd platoon in antitank positions vicinity of coordinates 698711 and 699721, 1/50,000. The advance and attack upon the town of Pithiviers, France, was begun by the 320th Infantry and Company "C" at 0700 hours. City fell under heavy attack at 0915 hours.

The command post of the reconnaissance company remained in vicinity of Poupry, France, coordinates 613625, 1/100,000. No enemy contact during the period. All reconnaissance platoons attached to gun companies. 1st to company "A"; 2d to Company "C"; and 3rd to Company "B". The company established a tank warning screen during the hours of darkness.

No indications of enemy armor operating in division sector.

Contact with the XX Corps and 5th Infantry Division maintained in the vicinity of Mainvillers, France. 4th Armored Division moved forward with their objective as Sens, France.




Dernière édition par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:42, édité 1 fois

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Re: Quand le 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion U.S. libérait le Loiret

Message par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:35

Command Post,
SW Pithiviers, France
Coord 883652, 1/100,000
212400 August 1944.


CT 134 began attack to the east at 210700 August, 1944, with objective as Barville and Gatinais, France. At 1200 hours the main body was in the town of Attray, France.

137th Infantry in assembly area in division reserve.

320th Infantry began advance to the east with objective of Pithiviers, France, which was occupied at 211200 August, 1944.

The enemy is covering the city of Montargis, France, and all approaches there to, with mines of all types, trip wires, delayed charges, booby-traps and antitank guns.

FFI and French civilians report that the enemy has withdrawn for the surroundings areas of the country, in a disorderly and hysterical retreat. Some enemy soldiers hiking under the hot summer sun and in the dust were reported crying, and muttering "too many Americans" "The Fuehrer did not tell us to expect this".

At 211800 August, 1944, the commanding general, 35th Infantry Division issued the following order:

Headquarters, 35th Inf Div APO 35
211800B, August, 1944
Subject: Information Re Task Force "S"
To: See Distribution.
1. Task Force "S" moves bulk of forces this evening to assembly area in woods west of Brienne-Le-Chateau (6282). Mission: Prepare to attack or counterattack from new position to northeast, east and southeast. Initiate reconnaissance at once upon arrival with this mission in view; continue to protect southeast flank of division.

2. Movement begins at approximate 211900B. Column 1, Colonel Byrnes, commanding, consists of CT 320 (lest 1 Inf battalion) (w/3905 Truck Company attached), moves via Vendeuvre - Brienne road. Column 2, Colonel McMahnon, commanding, (CO 183d FA Gp), consists of 182d Field Artillery Group (-), 737th Tank Battalion, 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion (less Company "C" and 2d Reconnaissance Platoon), moves via roads west of road used by CT 320 (-).

3. 35th Cavalry Reconnaissance Troop (-1 platoon) attached to Task Force "S", protects right flank of Task Force "S" during move; during night outpost principle roads leading from Brienne, France.

4. 3rd Battalion, 320th Infantry (w/ company "C" and 1st Rcn Pl., 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion attached) and (with 802nd FA Bn in direct support), remains generally in present position; defends line Vendeuvre - Bar-sur-Seine. Bulk of force in vicinity of Vendeuvre. Not to exceed one reinforced company vicinity of Bar-sur-Seine. Prepared to execute demolition of bridge at discretion of battalion commander. Mission: To protect south flank of Task Force "S".

5. Division command post: No change. Other division units: No change.

OFFICIAL: BAADE
Renfroe,
G-3
Contact with the XX Corps and 10th Infantry, 5th Division was maintained during the period.

10th Infantry, 5th Division in contact with enemy 6 kilometers west of LaChapelie.

CT 134 with Company "A", 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion in support moved out of their assembly area in the vicinity of Pithiviers, France, captured Ese in their zone of advance and are preparing to attack Montargis, France.

320th Infantry, with company "C", 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion in direct support, advanced to Ese France, prepared to attack Montargis, France.

The command post moved from the vicinity of Poupry, France, and established southwest of Pithiviers, France coordinates 883652, 1/100,000; closing at 1900 hours.

Enemy air reconnaissance planes were over the sector during the night but no bombing or strafing was accomplished by the enemy.

Company "A" and the 1st reconnaissance platoon in support of 134th Infantry, advanced and established their command post in the vicinity of Bouilly-en-Gatinais, France, coordinates 942587, 1/100,000, for the night; advancing a distance of 25 miles without enemy contact.

Company "B" moved from the vicinity of Poupry, France, at 1710 hours and established command post 4 miles west of Pithiviers, France, coordinates 872676, 1/100,00, at 1900 hours; a distance of 24 miles. The 3rd platoon on primary mission in Orleans, France.

Remainder of company in assembly area in the vicinity of the command post, 4 miles west of Pithiviers, in the vicinity of Assas, France. One prisoner was captured by the 3rd platoon in Orleans during the period.

Company "C" closed in their old area and established command post 3 1/2 miles east of Pithiviers, France, coordinates 947677, 1/100,000, at 1910 hours; a distance of 31 miles without enemy contact. Company in direct support of 320th Infantry prepared to attack the city of Montargis, France.

The Reconnaissance Company, less reconnaissance platoons, moved from their previous area and established command post 1 1/4 miles southwest of Courvilliers, France, coordinates 882645, 1/100,000, at 1910 hours without enemy contact; a total distance of 27 miles.

One reconnaissance platoon established a Tank Warning Screen from coordinates 693709 to 713655, 1/100,000, along the highway at 202000 August, 1944.




Dernière édition par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:42, édité 1 fois

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Re: Quand le 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion U.S. libérait le Loiret

Message par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:36

Command Post,
1 1/2 Mile E Villemoutiers, France.
Coord 162459, 1/100,000
222400 August 1944.


Division maintained contact with XX Corps and 5th Infantry Division on the north by the 35th Cavalry Reconnaissance Troop. 5th Infantry Division in contact with the enemy 6 kilometers west of La Chapellie-la-Seine, at 221115 August, 1944. CCA, 4th Armored Division reported to be on the outskirts of Montargis, France, preparing to attack the city from the north and west.

CT 134 in assembly area in the vicinity of Pithiviers, France, departed at 211840 August, 1944 and by 220700 August, had captured Ese, France, and were shuttling toward their next objective; Montargis, France.

The 137th Infantry was attached to the 4th Armored Division, with Company "B", 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion in support, for attack upon Montargis, France.

CT 320 went into an assembly area in the vicinity of Pithiviers, France, on 21 August, 02 and at 0700 hours started shuttling into Montargis from where they could attack the town. At the end of the period they were receiving artillery fire from the western approaches of Montargis, France.

At the close of the period at 2400 hours, the entire division was in attack positions on the western approaches of Montargis, prepared to attack the city upon orders from the division commander.

The enemy is covering the approaches to Montargis with mines, antitank ditches, road blocks, booby-traps and antitank guns. A few tanks are reported in dugin positions on the western approaches. Ten prisoners were captured from the 1010 Marsch Battalion during the period who stated that their unit came to Montargis to relieve the 11th Motorized Regiment who are already in the city. Upon arrival, the replacements found that the 11th Motorized Regiment had withdrawn. It is estimated that two companies of enemy infantry are west of the River in the outskirts of Montargis and about a regiment in the woods east of the city. The enemy is prepared to make a determined defense of the city from all reports of both the FFI and prisoners. The FFI reported that two AA guns and between 100-150 men in the town of Vitry-aux-Loges, are ready to surrender to American troops,. The FFI further reported that four enemy tanks are in hull-defilade position in the vicinity of coordinates 265451, 1/50,000. Two armored cares were knocked out in the vicinity of coordinates 243423, 1/50,000.

50 enemy soldiers were killed during the period and 10 prisoners captured.

At 1150 hours the army laid an artillery concentration in the vicinity of Jargeau, Bellegarde and Lorris, France.

The enemy has antitank positions, estimated to be two, at coordinates 250449, and a road block at 233449, 1/50,000, mined and protected by small arms fire.

There is also an enemy strong point, two tanks and a minefield in the vicinity of 2334?? 1/50,000. Reported by FFI at 2241 hours.

The command post, Headquarters and Reconnaissance Companies moved from southwest of Pithiviers, France, and established 1 1/2 east of Villemoutiers, France, coordinates 162459, 1/100,000, closing at 1650 hours and traveling a distance of 27 miles without enemy contact. Enemy reconnaissance planes were over the area during the night but no bombing or strafing reported.

Violent artillery duels raging in the outskirts of Montargis which is now in the primary stages of being attacked by the division and attached units.

Company "A" with the 1st Reconnaissance Platoon attached moved out as flank guard to the new assembly area; ran into enemy resistence and bivouacked in the vicinity of coordinates 205455, 1/100,000. The 1st platoon took up antitank positions at coordinates 206460; 2d platoon at 223439 and 3rd platoon at 223449, 1/100,000, under weak enemy resistence. No contact was made with the enemy during the hours of darkness. The command post of the company was established 4 miles west of Montargis, France, at coordinates 205455, 1/100,000.

Enemy road block discovered by reconnaissance platoon just at the west edge of Montargis, which consisted of fallen trees and two obsolete French tanks, mined and booby-trapped, was removed by Tech 4 Grade Eugene Lowry, Corporal Carl J. Schmidt, Corporal Lee C. Landrass, while enemy snipers fired upon them from their concealed positions along the river banks. Private Gussie Bowden admitted to hospital due to illness during the period.

The company was in direct support of the 134th Infantry during the period making final preparations for assault upon the city of Montargis, France.

The command post of Company "B" closed and established 2 miles east of La Don, France, at 1837 hours; a distance of 19 miles. No enemy contact during advance. All platoons on primary mission supporting 137th Infantry; except for the 3rd platoon which is yet attached to the 134th Infantry for direct assault mission. Command post established at coordinates 840535 in the vicinity of Joplin Blue. Mission to protect the south flank of the division.

Road blocks established and covered by the platoon at the following coordinates 842198 - 917193 - 053135 - 112082, all 1/100,000. The 1st platoon covering the first two and the 2d platoon covering the last two road blocks. 137th Infantry plans to move to the east during the day and capture the town of Bellegarde, France. All positions of the company were subjected to enemy artillery fire during the hours of darkness.

The command post of Company "C" closed in old area and established 1 mile northeast of Pannes (?), France, coordinates 210483, 1/100,000 at 0615 hours; a distance of 29 miles, without enemy contact. Company remained in direct support of the 320th Infantry and made final preparations for the attack upon the city of Montargis, France, on 23 August, 1944.

The Reconnaissance Company closed their command post at Gourvilliers, at 1500 hours and established 1 mile west of St Maurice-fur-Fessard, France, coordinates 167459, 1/100,000 at 1720 hours; a distance of 26 miles without enemy contact.

All reconnaissance platoons remained attached to gun companies during the period.




Dernière édition par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:43, édité 1 fois

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Re: Quand le 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion U.S. libérait le Loiret

Message par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:37

Command Post,
3 M E Montargis, France.
Coord 162459, 1/100,000
232400 August 1944.


The command post remained established 3miles east of Montargis, France during the period.

Weather overcast during the latter part of the period.

Division maintained contact with the XX Corps to the north during the period. CT 134 advanced to the outskirts of Montargis, France, during the period, meeting only slight and weak enemy resistence, mine fields and road blocks; and, a little enemy armor. At 1200 hours the 1st battalion, 134th Infantry fought their way in an encircling movement to the south outskirts of the city, with CT 320 attacking the city from the east. At 1200 hours patrols had entered the city proper from the southwest section of the city.

At 1400 hours the enemy had withdrawn in disorder, except for scattered groups, to the woods east of Montargis. Many antitank guns were destroyed in the attack upon the city but according to FFI reports at the end of the period there were as many as 12 antitank guns on the road between Montargis and Courtenay, France.

Scattered units commanded by an SS Lieut-Colonel defended the city of Montargis but when he saw it was useless he withdrew to the woods east of the city; withdrawing with his force as many guns as was possible; mostly antitank guns.

Enemy forces previously reported at Fontainebleau have withdrawn from the town. Also the AA guns and infantry reported in the vicinity of Vitry-aux-??? have retreated to the east. 12 enemy aircraft, identified as ME-109s and FW-190s strafed the division sector at Souppes and Sens, France, during the afternoon. Four of these aircraft were shot down by the 448th AAA Battalion.

The enemy is maintaining a road block about 4 kilometers northwest of Gien, France, defended by about 100 enemy soldiers.

Prisoners captured during the period totaled 42 and were from the 11th Panzer Grenadier Regiment, a part of the 9th Panzer Division. A total of 100 enemy soldiers were killed by the division and attached units during the period.

Company "A" established their command post in the vicinity of the command post of the 134th Infantry, in the vicinity of coordinates 233450, 1/50,000. The 1st platoon was placed in direct support of the 1st battalion; the 2d platoon in support of the 2d battalion and the 3rd platoon maintained antitank positions in the vicinity of CR at coordinates 233449, 1/50,000. At 1200 hours the platoon in support of the 1st battalion entered the city of Montargis from the south, and at 1300 hours the 134th Infantry and both platoons were established in the city. Bridges in the city were found intact. All elements of the company moving forward in pursuit of the retreating enemy, who is withdrawing to the woods east of the city. The 2d platoon in direct support of the 2d battalion continued their assault upon the enemy to the east and southeast of the town in the direction of Hill No. 130 and Amilly, France. The 1st platoon in direct support of the 1st battalion, moved into the town in the vicinity of the railroad, occupying that portion of the town south of the main road running northwest. The 3rd platoon went into antitank positions covering bridge in the vicinity of coordinates 273455, 1/50,000. The command post of Company "A" was established in the city of Montargis along with that of the 134th Infantry at 231700 August, 1944. The 1st and 3rd platoons assisted in talking the city of Montargis and the 2d platoon continued the assault to the east with the 2d battalion, 134th Infantry.

1st Lieut. Alexander H. Smith, Junior, platoon leader, 1st reconnaissance platoon, in direct support of the platoon killed an enemy soldier with his pistol when the enemy opened up on him with a "burp-gun". Private Holboch of the 1st reconnaissance platoon captured 2 German prisoners in the city.

The 3rd platoon in antitank positions in the vicinity of bridge at coordinates 273455, 1/50,000, are under intensive small arms fire.

Lieut. Smith and Staff Sergeant Jolly White, platoon sergeant, 1st reconnaissance platoon were among the first U.S. Soldiers to enter the city form the south; leading the 1st battalion 134th Infantry into the city after making reconnaissance of the sector.

Company "C" in direct support of the 3rd battalion, 134th Infantry, remained in the vicinity of Bellegarde, France, guarding road blocks and acting as rear guard for the division during the period. 1st and 2d platoons covering road blocks and the 3rd platoon in antitank positions in Bellegarde, France, on the Loire River.

The command post of Company "C" remaining in the same position until it moved into Montargis during the period. At 1400 hours a message was received from the company commander for Company "C" to the effect that his company alone had captured the city of Montargis.

Message as follows: We are in position 2746. We have taken the town alone. Infantry came up and established themselves after we captured town. We captured 100 prisoners. Knocked out two tanks and number of machine guns. Also captured unaccounted amount of AA, AT and machine guns; horses, wagons, cars, etc. Will give details later. All this done with the assistance of Dogpart who are with us. Lieut. Zach the battalion S-2 officer was dispatched to the city to investigate the civil population or determine any intelligence information about the enemy as the population could give him. He sent the following message at 1540 hours: I am trying to round up all rifles and machine guns. FFI seem to have taken everything of value. Forward this to Division G2 through Berry.

Company "B" established their command post at coordinates 200263 at 2115 hours after having been relieved of assignment of guarding road blocks and division rear.

All Company "A" had closed into Montargis by 1705 hours without casualties.

No personnel or vehicular casualties were suffered by Company "A"s and Company "C"s assault upon the city of Montargis. One M10 of Company "C" was hit by a round of artillery fire but caused only slight damage to the vehicle and no personnel casualties. The 2d reconnaissance platoon under Staff Sergeant Windham, spearheaded the assault of company "C" upon the city. Also with the 2d reconnaissance platoon was one section of the pioneer platoon of the reconnaissance company.

The following is a complete and detailed report of the action submitted by Captain D. L. Benton, Junior, the company commander of Company "C", 654tyh Tank Destroyer Battalion:

Subject: Report of action, Company "C", 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion, 22-23 August, 1944

To: Commanding Officer, 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion.
1. Mission: Direct support of CT 320.
Maps: 1/100,000, France.
a. 22d August 1944: CT objective - high ground west and north of Montargis. At approximately 221300 August, 1944, the 320th Infantry was in positions in the vicinity of Pannes, France and company "C" in antitank positions as follows:

1st platoon coordinates 222482
2d platoon coordinates 215520
3rd platoon coordinates 165486
The 2d reconnaissance platoon an pioneer section under Staff Sergeant Ruel Windham, were in the assembly area with company headquarters at coordinates 210484. I received a message that the units were planning to cross the stream directly to their front and immediately began reconnoitering for a route to cross the stream. I found that the bridge at coordinates 241471 had been completely demolished and further reconnaissance found that all bridges in our sector had been demolished, and that the canal was not fordable. I continued down the stream until I reached a bridge in the 134th Infantry's sector, which would be adequate to make a crossing. Further reconnaissance revealed that a small trail on both sides of the stream could be used by very little work. We immediately began to work on the trails, enlarging them into a passable road for the destroyers, and by 2400 hours were ready to move across the stream as soon as the infantry was firmly established. At about 2330 hours, one company of the 3rd battalion, 320th Infantry was across the stream and in position. The 1st battalion was in position in the vicinity of Pannes, slightly east of, and along the banks of the canal.

b. 23 August, 1944: At 0200 hours after consultation with the Combat Team Commander, and after notifying all friendly units, including CT 134 that we would be moving to the selected site of crossing, so that we would not be mistaken for the enemy, the 1st platoon moved along the cleared trail by the canal banks, south across the bridge at coordinates 199450, and then north to positions at coordinates 235169 into the 3rd battalion sector. The 3rd platoon was moved into position in support of the 1st battalion at coordinates 240273. The 2d platoon remained in antitank positions on the west side of the canal with the mission of guarding the rear and left flank of the attack.

It was learned that the 1st battalion planned to cross the stream at about 0600 hours, but crossing was not actually effected until about 0630-0700 hours. The men across the stream requested antitank support and the 2d platoon was brought from their positions to take the place of the 1st platoon, already across the stream. The 1st platoon then took up positions in the 1st battalion sector. Enemy troops were discovered directly northeast of the positions to which the company was to occupy. Their infantry was supported by two Mark IV tanks and it appeared that the tanks were maneuvering into position to bring fire upon the 1st platoon.

It was decided to allow one section of the platoon remain in front of the enemy tanks and maneuver in defilade, so that it would appear that they were still moving in the direction of the enemy tanks, while the other section moved by bounds to a firing position to the right flank (north). At this time, the reconnaissance platoon was called forward. The section started moving on its mission of flanking the enemy tanks with one-half of the security section furnishing flank protection against enemy bazooka and antitank fire. The section had almost reached their selected firing position, when a 37 mm antitank gun was discovered to the right of the section. They took up positions covering the escape route of the AT gun, but they were instructed not to fire as it would expose their positions. From these positions the area in front of the 3rd battalion could be covered and at the same time allow free use of the 2d platoon. At this time enemy tanks were moving into cover and across country. The 2d platoon moved under cover, and by bounds to a position 600 yards forward to try to cover the escape route of the enemy tanks. They reached their designated positions but the enemy tanks began to move again. The 2d Reconnaissance Platoon arrived and was committed on the flanks of the platoons. The battalion commander of the 3rd battalion, 320th Infantry was then informed of the situation. He stated that Company "I" was enroute to the area and should have arrived. Friendly artillery began to fall in the area and Lieut. Ellis, company liaison officer with the 320th Infantry was told of the fact and directed to give the artillery our positions and to lift their fire. Enemy tanks were observed moving again and some German foot troops milling around in an area about 400 yards from the platoons positions to the left. One destroyer was moved into position between two houses when an enemy MK IV tank was observed less than 200 yards distant attempting to escape by a route which had been overlooked. He appeared to be having difficulty and with his flank facing the platoon made an excellent target. Some enemy AT guns were also attempting to withdraw from the area, and tank destroyer commanders were reporting movement to their front. The situation had gone far enough so all personnel were immediately instructed to fire upon anything that looked like it was German. Private Ramsey, .50 caliber gunner on my armored car opened up on the sides of the tank, and he stopped immediately to investigate or something went wrong with his motor. One of the destroyers opened fire upon him, knocking off a track and destroying the bogies on that side of the tank. A second shot went through the side of the tank and a third through the motor, setting the tank on fire. The tank burned and all personnel were killed. All antitank guns that were observed previously were either destroyed or captured along with the personnel. Civilians reported a group of enemy soldiers hiding in a barn. A few rounds of .50 caliber machine gun fired into the bard the enemy soldiers surrendered. At this point, it was observed that another group of enemy soldiers with antitank guns were attempting to get out of the area and other equipment. They were directly in the line of fire with a group of civilian homes and it was decided to hold our fire and try to outflank them. Staff Sergeant Windham with his 2d reconnaissance platoon, covered the only escape route the enemy had which was not under fire along the banks of the canal in the vicinity of coordinates 268457. The 2d platoon proceeded around the left flank, leaving the 1st platoon to take care of the prisoners and any other resistence that might arise in the area.

The 2d platoon was nearing their firing positions when it was noticed that several AT guns, drawn by horses, were moving along the banks of the canal. Private Ramsey fired about 100 rounds of .50 caliber ammunition, and those living, stopped their horses and surrendered.

About the same time, a TD from the 1st platoon was moving into a better firing position when an enemy AT gun on the right flank fired a shot at him, striking the front and ricocheting and striking the track, breaking a block and causing the track to break and collapse. The maintenance section under Staff Sergeant Windham was called and the track on the destroyer was rapidly repaired and back into action within 20 minutes.

The destroyer section on the right flank opened up on the AT gun and destroyed it and captured the crew.

From our positions we could see the east side of the city of Montargis, and from this position we could easily cover it with fire. It appeared that all resistence in the area had ceased, and that anything in our vicinity could be taken care of by one platoon, as they were either attempting to get out of the area or were surrendering.

The 2d platoon and the 2d reconnaissance platoon were moved into position to block any attempted retreat from coordinates 276447 - 278468 - 270450, overrunning a number of AT guns being pulled by prime movers and a number of infantry trying to escape by foot. The security section was employed to guard the prisoners and captured material while the 2d platoon and the 2d reconnaissance platoon moved on to their objective, overrunning another column of horse drawn vehicles loaded with mortars and other equipment. As the 2d platoon and the 2 reconnaissance platoon drew into position they caught a kitchen truck and two large personnel carriers coming from a side street, loaded with clothing and ammunition, etc.

By 1130 hours, it appeared that all organized resistence had ceased. We entered the German Headquarters in the city and French civilians stated that the German General and his staff had been gone only a matter of minutes. At this point CT 134 and CT 320 started entering the city while the civilian population went wild and mad with joy; breaking all German signs, hanging out hidden U.S. and French flags and passing out drinks to the men.

Enemy prisoners and equipment continued to be brought in. Some enemy soldiers, just realizing that they were trapped, swam the canal, but the canal had been covered with fire and they swam directly into prison as they emerged from the water.

The total toll inflicted upon the enemy by this bold action of Company "C" was:

DESTROYED: Two MK IV tanks; five antitank guns; 1 self-propelled assault gun; ten machine guns, caliber .31 and three strong points.

CAPTURED: Twelve horses; 15 antitank guns; 6 AA guns; 2 kitchen trucks; 10,000 rounds .31 caliber ammunition; one 1/4 ton jeep; 1 ton truck (?) ; 3 general purpose trucks loaded with blankets and clothing; two 10 passenger vehicles; one 30 passenger personnel carrier; five automatic rifles; 140 enlisted men and 10 officers (all them ugh-bred Nazis).

CT 137 captured and secured Sens, France, during the period. CT 137 remained attached to 4th Armored Division. 35th Cavalry Reconnaissance Troop maintained contact with 5th Infantry Division on the north, and secured bridges in the vicinity of Souppe, France.




Dernière édition par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:43, édité 1 fois

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Re: Quand le 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion U.S. libérait le Loiret

Message par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:37

Command Post,
3 Miles East of Montargis, France.
Coord 162459, 1/100,000.
242400 August, 1944.


CT 134 occupied the city of Montargis, France, during the period against very little resistence. One battalion moved to the southeast of the city to prevent the escape of enemy troops from the city to the north.

CT 137 remained attached to the 4th Armored Division.

CT 320 assisted in the capture of Montargis. One reinforced rifle company sent to Fontenay, France, to guard Engineers building bridge there as enemy troops were reported in the area planning to attack the Engineers, and were in position by 240400 August, 1944.

At the end of the period Montargis had been completely liberated and scattered enemy troops were being rounded up; some in civilian clothing and hiding in sewers of the city.

At the end of the period, the enemy had no organized front line in the division sector.

There were no defensive positions contacted upon reconnaissance as far east at Courtenay, France and Joigny, France. French civilians report about 200 enemy soldiers in woods at coordinates G425220, 1/100,000. Air reconnaissance reported about 40 horse drawn vehicles moving south and east form Aillant-Sur-Thelen, at 1100 hours.

Small groups of enemy resistence were encountered to the east and southeast of Joigny, France.

Remnants of the 243rd Division and 708th Division are in this area and are capable of interfering with the movement and advance of the division to the north and east.

In addition to the 758th Infantry Regiment of the 338th Division and the 9th Regiment of the 11th Panzer Division, 348th Marsch Battalion, in the sector now positively identified, prisoners were also captured form the 9th company, 921st Regiment, 243rd Division and 708th Engineer Battalion and 728th Regiment of the 708th Division were identified.

A total of 168 prisoners were captured by the division and attached units during the period. 20 enemy soldiers were killed.

A grand total of 725 prisoners were captured in Montargis by the division and attached units.

The command post of the battalion remained 3 miles East of Montargis, France, in the vicinity of Villemoutiers, France.

The weather during the period was overcast, with light showers.

The command posts of Companies "A" and "C" established in Montargis upon its liberation on the 23rd remained in the city during the period, with antitank positions covering all bridges and approaches to the city form the east, southeast and northeast. One platoon of Company "A" in antitank positions east of Montargis. No enemy contact during the period by either of the companies. Continued to mop-up in and around Montargis, France.

Company "A"'s CP in large Hotel in Montargis, on the main square of the city. 2d platoon continued assault to the east. FFI in all types of uniforms, with all types of guns sprung up in the town when the Germans were driven out on the 23rd. FFI reported to headquarters that they had captured the retreating German General and his Staff as they were getting out of Montargis, on foot, and had shot the entire party. The FFI take no prisoners. All German collaborists were immediately rounded up, tried and shot during the afternoon. Women, and girl friends of the Germans, were disrobed, their heads shaven, hand tied behind them and paraded around the main sections of the city in the nude, guarded by FFI with horse whips, who would occasionally lash one just of the hell of it. The 2d platoon in position in the vicinity of Amilly, France, just east of Montargis has established a road block on the main highway, and are covering it with their guns. Enemy mine field reported in the vicinity of coordinates 291428, 1/50,000. 134th Infantry has strong patrols going east to edge of Foret de Montargis but at 0855 hours no enemy contact had been made. French civilians report about 2000 enemy soldiers at Ouzeuer-Sur-Trozee, France and 2d Calvary reports enemy force in the town of ST Maurice, France at 1831 hours.

The command post of Company "B" remained in the same location, attached to the 3rd battalion, 134th Infantry. At about 1515 hours, the 1st platoon, along with the 3rd reconnaissance platoon under 1st Lieut. John W. Spain, and Raymond R. Wilson, attacked entered, captured and occupied the town of Gein, France against strong enemy resistence.

A total of 19 prisoners were captured in the town of while 11 were Italian artillery men, 1 German flak artillery man and seven German infantrymen, causing the others to flee the town in front of a hail of steel from the battalions guns. These platoons were the first American soldiers to enter this town since World War I, and they received a reception by the population that is noteworthy of history. The 2d and 3rd platoons of Company "B" remained along the Loire River, guarding road blocks and protecting the south flank of the division. No enemy contact.

Headquarters Company and Medical Detachment remained in the vicinity of the command post.

Some enemy air activity occurred over the area during the night but no bombing or strafing reported in our immediate sector.

Division maintained contact with XX Corps and 10th Infantry, 5th Infantry Division, on the north in the vicinity of Montreau, France. 11th Infantry, 5th Infantry Division occupied Fontainbleau, France and the 2d Infantry, Montreau, France, during the period.

CT 134 (- 3rd battalion ) occupied Montargis at 231315 August, 1944




Dernière édition par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:44, édité 1 fois

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Re: Quand le 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion U.S. libérait le Loiret

Message par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:38

Command Post,
2 1/2 Miles West of Courtenay, France.
Coord 468474, 1/100,000.
252400 August, 1944.


CT 134 continued to mop up in the city of Montargis, France. The 3rd battalion, 134th Infantry, after being relieved from guarding road blocks along the Loire River, reverted to battalion control. The town of Joigny, France, was liberated by the 134th Infantry during the period.

CT 137 (- 3rd battalion) remained attached to the 4th Armored Division, after liberating the city of Sens, France, established strong guards in and around the city as to secure it.

The 3rd battalion, securing Orleans, was relieved during the period and reverted to regimental control.

CT 320 remained in Montargis, France, mopping up in the town, and sending strong patrols and guards to secure the towns of Sueppes and Fontenay, France. CT (-2d battalion) started advance toward Courtenay, France, at 0700 hours, mopping up woods along the route of advance.

All division advancing toward Courtenay, France, at the end of the period, capturing many enemy stragglers who were cut off and left in the woods by their retreating units.

At the end of the period the enemy had no organized front line in the division sector.

It was established that there are no strong enemy defenses as far east of Courtenay, France. Small scattered groups of enemy cut-off and surrounded continued to surrender to our advancing troops, but the bulk of the enemy's forces in this sector have withdrawn to the east and southeast. Enemy troops guarding road blocks in the vicinity of Gien, were attacked, captured and annihilated and put to flight by the 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion. Enemy attempted to put up a fight at Fortenay, but was overrun and his forces either annihilated or captured. A civilian report as of the 24th reported that about 200 enemy soldiers, with horse-drawn vehicles and artillery, were retreating southwest out of Chateaurenard, France. Prisoners were captured from the 758th Regiment, 338th Division. Some prisoners were from scattered units who were in the vicinity of Montargis, when it was attacked by our forces. The 757th and 759th Infantry Regiments of the 338th Division are thought to be available as disorganized reserves in our sector. A total of 725 prisoners were captured during the period by the division.

At 1255 hours, the FFI reported enemy vehicles in woods just north of Chuelles, France, and two officers and an undetermined number of soldiers in woods in the vicinity of coordinates 430445, 1/100,000. At 1550 hours, the FFI reported an estimated group of enemy soldiers in woods at coordinates 420230, 1/100,000. Air reconnaissance reports 40 horse drawn vehicles, moving south and east from Aillant-Sur-Thelen, France at 1900 hours. Prisoners captured in the town of Joigny, France, are from the artillery, which is from south France. They report that their division is thoroughly cut-up and disorganized.

The command post closed 3 miles East of Montargis, France, at 250900 August, 1944, and established 1 1/2 miles east of Courtenay, France, coordinates 468474, 1/100,000 at 251055 August, 1944, advancing a total distance of 22 miles.

The weather during the period was fair and warm; excellent for operations.

All companies directed to double outposts to prevent a surprise attack by surrounded enemy forces in the sector. At 1414 hours, 100 enemy soldiers were reported 300 meters north west of Chuelles,France.

The command post of Company "A" was established in the vicinity of Les Pays, France during the period, and was relieved from direct support of the 134th Infantry, except for the 1st platoon and 1st reconnaissance platoon under Lieut. Alexander H. Smith, Junior, which remained in direct support of the 3rd platoon, 134th Infantry.

The 1st platoon of company "A" under 1st Lieut. Michael P. Elcano and Staff Sergeant Walter P.Moore, in support of the 3rd battalion, 134th Infantry, supported that battalion in mopping up in and around Montargis, France, and in reconnaissance missions to the east, liberating the town of Joigny, France, capturing over 900 prisoners from the 338th and 708th German Infantry Divisions.

The 2d platoon, Company "A" upon arrival in assembly area at Les Pays, France, took up antitank positions in the vicinity of coordinates 470755, 1/50,000.

Company "B" after taking the town of Gien, France, was relieved from supporting the 3rd battalion, 134th Infantry, and closed in assembly area in the vicinity of Thimony, France, and from there it moved to Les Pays, France, under battalion control to the battalion assembly area., Company was relieved from supporting the 320th and the 134th Infantry Regiments.

Company "C" was relieved from direct support of the 320th Infantry, and moved from Montargis, France, to the battalion assembly area, 1 mile northeast of Chuelles, France.

First Sergeant Barnausky of Company "C was transferred to Company "A" during the period. First Sergeant Owen, the company first sergeant, was transferred to Company "A" during the period.

The command post of the reconnaissance company established in the battalion assembly area in the vicinity of Les Guaguins, France, during the period.

Reconnaissance platoons remained attached to companies "A,"B", "C", during the period.

The 1st reconnaissance platoon under 1st Lieut. Alexander H. Smith, Jr. and Staff Sergeant Jolly White, accompanied the 1st platoon of Company "A" on their mission with the 3rd battalion, 134th Infantry ; occupying and mopping up in and around Joigny, France.

At 1630 hours while the platoon was patrolling the road between Joigny and Auxerre, France, they were attacked by a group of enemy soldiers in the vicinity of Appoigny, France. As a result of this action Pvt1cl Aloysious J. Morarity and Private Paul E. Anders are missing in action, and Private Robert T. Beatty, wounded in the leg by enemy mortar fire. It is reported that Private Morarity was seriously wounded in the abdomen and was evacuated by the FFI who were also supporting the attack in that sector; and, that Private Anders is yet hiding out with the FFI in the area.

One jeep and one motorcycle were completely destroyed by the enemy in this action. Private 1cl Ernest Prough, Medical Detachment, platoon aid man accompanying the attack, was slightly wounded and was rescued by the local FFI who advised him to change his uniform for civilian clothing and try to get back to our lines; which he did, returning to the unit the following day where he was awarded the purple heart.

The sky vibrated at 2300 hours with British planes enroute to Germany. Captain Witherspoon and Sergeant Koon(?) on duty in the command post was sweating them out.

Captain Samuel L. Goldheim, missing in action since 12 July 1944, reported recaptured in hospital, when the city of Soissons, France, fell to advancing American troops.

At 1801 hours a message was received from the G2 section of the Division to be on the alert for an enemy attack from the chewed-up elements hiding out in the woods in the sector.

Machine gun posts and bazooka-teams were immediately established and skirmish lines fixed so as to give the enemy a reception when he entered the area.

3rd battalions of 134th and 137th Infantries relieved in Orleans during the period.

The 5th Infantry Division has completed 3 bridges across the Seine River and another under construction. 319th Infantry, 80th Infantry Division, relieved 3rd battalions, 134th and 137th Infantry Regiments, in Orleans, France during the period.

It is reported that the 4th Armored Division, with 137th Infantry attached, have entered the city of Troyes, France, or are operating in its outskirts.




Dernière édition par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:44, édité 1 fois

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Re: Quand le 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion U.S. libérait le Loiret

Message par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:38

Command Post,
2 1/2 Miles West of Courtenay, France.
Coord 468474, 1/100,000.
262400 August, 1944.


The 2d battalion, 320th Infantry, guarding bridges at Souppes and Fortenay, France, were relieved and joined the regiment during the period.

137th Infantry remained attached to 4th Armored Division now operating in the vicinity of Troyes, France.

134th Infantry in assembly area 2 1/2 miles West of Courtenay, France.

35th Cavalry Reconnaissance Troop maintained contact with XX Corps on the north; patrolling Sens, Cheroy, Pont-sur-Yonne, and the south flank of the division between Douchy and Gien, Franc; making contact with the 319th Infantry, 80th Division, in Gien, France.

In general, the division mopped up in Cheroy, Douchy, Montargis, and sent elements as far east as St. Florentine; patrolling the right flank of the XII Corps.

Units continue to capture small overrun groups of enemy prisoners and stragglers with respective sectors, with large number of prisoners coming from the south in the vicinity of Joigny, France.

At this phase, the enemy has no organized front line in our sector. No defensive positions have been contacted, other than local, weak positions of scattered units.

Enemy south of our sector is reported moving to the east, southeast and northeast.

Prisoners continue to be captured from the 758th Regiment, 338th Division; and the 728th Regiment, 708th Division. Many prisoners have also been captured form the Marsch Battalions in our sector.

A total of 1,134 prisoners were captured during the period.

Weather was fair and warm throughout the period.

At 1400 hours, the FFI reported that a strong enemy force was attempting to re-enter the town of Appoigny, France; coming out of the woods west of the town.

At 1800 hours, the Reconnaissance Company encountered one enemy tank; one AT gun and 60 infantry men in the town of Appoigny, France; who were taken care of by the platoon.

The entire battalion, less the 1st platoon of Company "A" and 1st Reconnaissance Platoon, remained in the assembly area west of Courtenay on an alert status, prepared to move, attack or repulse any enemy threat which developed within the sector. First echelon motor maintenance was performed during the period and the men had a chance to somewhat relax and rearrange and clean their equipment in preparation for the next attack.

Company "C" captured one enemy soldier in civilian clothes in the assembly area. In making a reconnaissance of the sector, small disorganized demoralized groups were encountered, but they were promptly and efficiently eliminated.

All outposts in the assembly are doubled and antitank and machine gun positions manned on a 24 hour basis.

A few enemy planes flew over the area during the hours of darkness but no bombing or strafing was accomplished by the Luftwaffa.

New tracks are being put on the destroyers during the period the battalion is in the assembly area.

The 5th Infantry Division is crossing the Seine River at Montreau, France. The 2d Infantry, 5th Division, crossing Yonne River at Misy, France, with their objective as Nogent, France. Elements of CCA, 4th Armored Division operating in the vicinity of Villeneauve L'Archeveque, France. 80th Infantry Division vicinity Corbellies, France.

2d Cavalry patrolling south flank of XII Crops.

The 1st platoon Company "A" and 1st Reconnaissance Platoon remained on assault mission with the 3rd battalion, 134th Infantry, vicinity of Joigny, France. The 1st section of the 3rd platoon, Company "A", relieved the 1st section of the 1st platoon, in their mission at Joigny, France, so that tracks could be changed on their destroyers.

Strong local security maintained in the are during the period due to the presence of enemy troops and armor hiding out in the woods in division sector. FFI reported that enemy maybe planning a coordinated attack from three directions upon the assembly area during the night. All weapons and rocket-launching teams alerted.




Dernière édition par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:44, édité 1 fois

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Re: Quand le 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion U.S. libérait le Loiret

Message par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:39

Command Post,
2 1/2 miles West Courtenay, France.
Coord 468474, 1/100,000
272400 August, 1944.


CT 134 patrolled the road from St Romain to St Florentine, France, during the period.

CT 137 remained in the vicinity of Lorris and Courtenay, France and reconnoitered area in the vicinity of Orleans, France - Gien, Chateaurenard and Saint Romain.

CT 320 remained in the assembly area in the vicinity of Courtenay, France, prepared to move to vicinity of Troyes, France, upon orders.

The Division assumed responsibility for the protection of the south flank of the Third U.S. Army from Orleans, Gien, Sens and Troyes, France, during the period; dispersing units lightly along the sector, with strong mobile reserve forces in the vicinity of the division command post.

The enemy at the end of the period had no organized line in the division's sector.

Small concentrations of troops have been reported in the vicinity of Mansilly and Vouzon, France. No new unit identifications have been contacted.

An enemy column containing infantry and artillery, estimated to be one regiment, passed through Molosmes, France, moving in a southeasterly direction. This force may be committed on the south or east flank in a counterattack at any time.

All enemy activity was moving to the east, northeast and southeast during the period.

FFI report 300 enemy soldiers at Argent-sur-Sauldry, France. Enemy has no artillery in the town. A column of enemy tanks was reported moving in the direction of Troyes, France, during the afternoon.

213 prisoners were captured during the period.

White markings on fighter-bomber planes removed on the 17th August, 1944.

At 1515 hours it was reported that the enemy had pulled a Panzer Division into position in the woods southeast of Troyes, France, in the vicinity of Courtenot, France. Division was alerted for immediate movement to the sector if there is any indication of attack.

The reconnaissance elements of the division maintained contact with the XX Corps on the left flank during the period. The 4th Armored Division northeast of Troyes, France, continued to advance against stubborn enemy resistence. The 90th Division went into an assembly area in the vicinity of Sens, France; having been relieved by the 137th Infantry.

CT 134 with Company "A" protects south flank of the TUSA from Saint Romain le Preux to Troyes, France, inclusive.

CT 137 protects flank from Orleans to Saint Romain le Preux, France. It relieved elements of the 80th Division along the Loire River.

CT 320 relieved the 4th Armored Division holding the city of Troyes and secured the city from the East and South. Local FFI cooperating in securing the sector.

The command post of the 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion remained 2 1/2 miles west of Courtenay, France, during the period. Very little activity. Small groups of enemy cut-off and surrounded continue to be rounded up with very little resistence.

The weather during the period was warm and fair, with excellent visibility.

All elements of the battalion remained in the assembly area on an alert status. Tracks continued to be changed on the destroyers, along with the performance of first echelon motor maintenance. Reconnaissance was made of outlying sectors and survey missions accomplished in the sector. The 1st platoon of Company "A' and the first reconnaissance platoon remained in the vicinity of Joigny and St Florentine, France, securing those towns and guarding bridges in the sector.

Enemy planes were over the area during the night but no bombs or strafing were reported in the division sector. At 1315 hours the pioneer platoon of the reconnaissance company was sent to Villenenve-sur-Yonne, France, to ascertain the status of bridges spanning the Yonne River in that sector. Bridges were found to be intact and capable of accommodating the battalion's destroyers.


Dernière édition par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:45, édité 1 fois

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Re: Quand le 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion U.S. libérait le Loiret

Message par Fab le Mar 28 Fév - 12:40

source :

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Dernière édition par Fab le Mer 29 Fév - 7:37, édité 1 fois

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Re: Quand le 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion U.S. libérait le Loiret

Message par Invité le Mer 29 Fév - 7:20

excuse l'anglais et moi je prefere la langue de moliére sic

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Re: Quand le 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion U.S. libérait le Loiret

Message par Fab le Mer 29 Fév - 7:41

C'est peu dire qu'il y a beaucoup d'anglais dans le texte Wink

Ce journal de marche est très intéressant pour savoir comment s'est passé la libération du département .

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Re: Quand le 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion U.S. libérait le Loiret

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